Dear Parents...How to Get Your Kindergartener Ready

 

Dear Parents,

Summer vacation is drawing to a close. Some of you may be thinking ‘No!!’ while others are thinking “Yay!!”. That’s okay either way! But, I was thinking as I went out shopping for school supplies today that you might be a little bit nervous about your child heading into kindergarten. Here are some things that your child’s teacher would absolutely love for you to know or do starting now to make the process easier for you and your child:

 

  • Start a schedule. Creating a schedule of an early bedtime and an early rise time is a great way to get your child ready to go back to school. If they have spent months sleeping in till 10:00 every morning, waking them up at 6:00 am out of the blue is NOT going to make a great school experience for them or you come August or September. Starting now, several weeks out from the first day, will build an essential routine.
  • Find an afternoon space. Your life after school will be way less hectic if you already have a spot for your child’s school items to be stored as well as a homework spot.
  • Go ahead and try it out! That afternoon spot is a great place to go ahead and sit with your child. Have them color or read at the spot, make sure they are comfortable, and even gather supplies so they are all together.
  • Work on independence. It’s hard for some children at the beginning of the kindergarten because often (not always though) many things have been done for them. Let your child start having extra responsibilities (i.e. take out the trash, feed the animals, water the plants, etc.) that aren’t hard but are important. this helps them be more confident. You can always use a little extra incentive to help too like using the Vivofit Jr:
  • Getting dressed. Kindergarteners should be able to dress themselves and take care of everything that occurs in the bathroom. Teachers aren’t all to help with these things. Shoe tying is usually something they can learn throughout the year BUT putting on jackets themselves is an important skill to learn at home.
  • Be positive. Keep a great, positive outlook on your child’s beginning to their education. Remember, they learn a lot from you as parents, if they know you didn’t like school as a kid, they are going to be worried. Talk about how much fun they will have learning how to read and write, how proud of them you are, and how smart they are already!
  • Read, read, read. As Kindergarten teachers, we can tell who has been read to and who hasn’t. Spend time reading with your child and to your child. They can point out letters that they know already, you can show them new ones, and you can even show them beginning sight words. You can even teach your child the parts of the book (title, cover, pages, etc,) and how to read (point left to right as you read the words).