Pumpkin Book Reports

Oct 19, 2014 | Fall, Freebies, Literacy, October, TpT in Action | 2 comments

Pumpkin Book Reports are one of my favorite family projects each year!  It’s so simple and gives you such a great family activity for the month October.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Print the free letter and assign a due date.  Have them be due a couple days before you present them.
  2. Families make the pumpkins at home to resemble a book or a character.
  3. Students bring them in.  You display them and have the kids present their pumpkins to the class.

Here are a few of my personal favorite Pumpkin Book Reports I have seen over the years:

Pumpkin Book Report - Captain Underpants

(Courtesy of the Ms. Johnson and the other teachers at Richardson Elementary via the Simply Kinder Teacher Facebook Group).

Pumpkin Book Report - Bad Case of the Stripes

(Courtesy of the Ms. Johnson and the other teachers at Richardson Elementary via the Simply Kinder Teacher Facebook Group).

Pumpkin Book Report - Junie B. Jones

(Courtesy of the Ms. Johnson and the other teachers at Richardson Elementary via the Simply Kinder Teacher Facebook Group).

Pumpkin Book Report - Rainbow Fish

(Courtesy of the Ms. Johnson and the other teachers at Richardson Elementary via the Simply Kinder Teacher Facebook Group).

 

 

Do the pumpkins always look so perfect and polished?

The honest answer is no.  There are two philosophies here, and as a teacher I respect both.  First, parents and kids do the project “together.”  They work together with the guidance of the parent.  Second, is the parents allow the kids the artistic freedom to create on their own, supporting them but not directing the artistic elements.  It’s a whole mommy debate and as teachers we just have to accept we will get both kinds of pumpkins.  (And the kids don’t care, they are just excited to be doing something so cool).

Here are some additional samples of Pumpkin Book Reports you may get:

Pumpkin Book Report - Clifford

(Courtesy of the Ms. Johnson and the other teachers at Richardson Elementary via the Simply Kinder Teacher Facebook Group).

 
Pumpkin Book Report - There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves
 This one was a little bit of an issue for this student because the parent used the marker as the medium.  The marker was rubbing off and so he was a little upset. If you are making these with your children, be sure to think of that.  To fix we presented his first and then at recess we traced it with my Marks-A-Lot marker which is super permanent.  FYI – the child still grinned ear to ear because of the thought and time that went into this project.
I love this one because it was a nonfiction book report!  All kids love nonfiction books so it was a great way for him to share what he knew about sharks in a creative, artful manner!

What do you do if a student does not bring in a pumpkin?

It will always happen that one or two students does not have a Pumpkin Book Report for various reasons.  I am the type of teacher that does not let that stop me from doing these amazing projects and so I will spend time with that student on my lunch hour or during recess to make a pumpkin. Talk about feeling special – everyone wants to do a pumpkin with the teacher.  I purposefully have my reports due 2-3 days before we present so I have time to make sure every student has one.  I will pick up some foam pumpkins and sometimes at Walmart you can find pumpkin decorating kits like shown above.

Get your free Pumpkin Book Report download here:

I like to give my families about 2 weeks to prep these and bring them into class.  So now is the time to be planning this pumpkin project!  Letters and book reports are free in my Simply Kinder TpT store below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Comments

  1. Noonah

    Great idea! Thanks for sharing all of the examples. What about parents who can’t buy a pumpkin (for time and money)?

    Reply
    • Jennifer @ Simply Kinder

      Great question. Walmart and Target sell ready made kits for this for like under $5. So I always pick a few up and take the time with those who can’t or don’t at lunch or during specials. I would say it is usually about 1 or maybe two each year. I also have the kids bring them in a few days before so that way I have time to get those done that I need to do with them. (One year I had a great parent volunteer do them too.) In the article above, the Hello Kitty one is an example of when this happened. She felt super special that she got to do her pumpkin with me and everyone else had to do it at home. =)

      Reply

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