Teachers Who Bully Other Teachers

Oct 16, 2015 | Teacher Rants, Teacher Wisdom | 116 comments

An open letter to teacher who bully other teachers! Enough is enough!

Dear Teacher Bully,

This letter has been a long time coming and I have ignored this situation long enough.  I am tired of teachers who bully other teachers.  I have been a victim and seen too many friends go through it to just sit back anymore!   In the past, your actions have made me feel inferior, and I am ready for it to stop.   I am NOT inferior!

In true teacher fashion, I made a list.

For the love of teaching and teamwork, please stop doing these things:

  • Stop sharing your opinion all the time.  Everyone knows how  you feel, so constantly stating the same opinion again and again is not going to change my opinion on the matter at hand, even if I choose to just sit silently and let you speak.  I have no energy for things that are not constructive.  If there is a conversation happening, and you believe differently, just stay out of it.  We know how you feel.
  • Stop speaking for others.  ‘This person said this’ or ‘this person said that,’ as a means to justify your point is more than obvious.  If those people wanted to share their opinion, they would share their opinion, participate in the conversation at hand.  Guess what? They are not in the conversation, so your second hand pieces of information are not valid in your constant explanation of your own opinions.
  • Stop speaking over me.  I can tell by your body language that when anyone else speaks, you are completely uninterested.  It’s rude and it’s not professional.
  • Stop speaking at me.  If you want to talk about teaching, learning, or the business of education then let’s have a conversation about it.  Don’t exert your opinions on me again and again, and then dismiss the opportunity for a conversation.  Your approach to communication makes others feel as if they cannot have an opinion for fear of what you might say or do next.  People engaged in conversations with you fear you. Let that sink in for a few moments.  People. Fear. You.
  • Stop talking about yourself all the time.   I know your lesson was perfect and we know that administration loves you.  You do have some amazing lessons and teaching practices, but that does not make you the be-all-end-all of teaching. It also does not make your ideas any better than anyone else.  Sharing is of course great, but it’s a two way street and if you are not open to listening to other people’s successes than we don’t want to hear yours.
  • Stop saying each year your class is the best or the worst class ever.  Why does it have to only be both extremes?  When you have 4-5 other teammates, it’s highly unlikely that your class is the worst/best behaved or the worst/best at reading every single year!  It puts others down and devalues that the struggle in our profession is real. We all feel it – trust me.
  • Stop running and telling administration everything that happens.  I am not admitting to doing anything wrong, but if you have an issue with me, then talk to me.  I should not have to hear from my administration that so-and-so says I am in violation of the handbook.  No one likes “that teacher” who constantly has their nose up administration’s rear-end….and to be honest it is contributing to my feelings of you being a bully because I can’t talk openly around you.
  • Stop teaching the same thing again and again and again.  Guess what.. it’s not 1984 anymore and there are all sorts of new concepts and learning approaches out there!  Don’t judge me for graciously accepting your “binder of resources” that has been handed down again and again and then not following it exactly. I am a professional, and I choose to create resources and teach concepts that are up to date.  And I won’t judge you for teaching the same thing for 32 years.  For the record, I have shared, and you have not been open to other ideas outside the binder.  {Whoa – that was a little more passive aggressive than I normally am.}
  • Stop criticizing others for trying new things.  Best practices change, and you have to be able to ebb and flow with them!  You can’t pass judgement on others who choose to have an open mind about new ideas.  Of course, you can challenge new ideas, but don’t be closed off to trying them.
  • Stop excluding others.  It’s just not nice and although it may not be considered bullying, for example,  to buy 2 out of 3 teachers a soda on your team it is just not nice.   And on a wider level…having groups of people that openly or secretly meet is just rude.  What are you doing that is so secretive that others cannot know?  Do you really think you are that much better than the rest of us?  Because in my opinion, this very approach makes you weak and dependent and it’s not for the good of all!  #counterintuitive  I don’t know what ya’ll are talking about at your secret cocktail hours, but I really don’t care so stop going out of your way to make sure I know.
  • Stop throwing me under the bus.  Seriously.  We may not be best friends, but we are in this together. We don’t all have to be the exact same.  We can respect each other and work together without having to tattle and talk negatively about what others are doing.  If we are both a minute or two late for duty – you don’t have to tell everyone you were there first.
  • Stop telling me what and how to teach.  We all went to college and we all have a boss. We all earned our places in the classroom!  I can sleep at night knowing that I am a professional, and I take my job very seriously.  Again – I can sleep at night knowing that what I am doing is right for me and my career.  Not to say that you don’t, but I like to lift people up, encourage, and help others, and not pass judgement or throw stones.  If there are any REAL issues with how others choose to do their jobs, it’s an issue for administration.  Not an open issue you should talk about.  So I will continue to do my work in dynamic ways and if there is an issue, someone with the authority to do so will inform me to stop.
  • Stop talking about other teachers or professionals.  If you have a problem with someone, go speak to them privately.  Otherwise accept how they are and move on.  When you talk trash about others, you are only making yourself seem weak!
  • Stop being unwilling to change. If there is one thing that is constant in education, (and in life in general) it is that things change. If you can’t get with the program and change with how your professional environment thinks you should, then maybe this is not the profession for you.  We are tired of hearing you complain about it and others feel as if we have to be on your side in order to not become the target of your negativity!

Enough is enough.  We are all here for the students, and we all have different viewpoints and beliefs on teaching, learning, and the business side of education.  We as professionals need to find a way to get along, respect one another, and not make anybody feel inferior because of our differences.  We should celebrate those differences the same as we do with our students!

To say someone is a bully is a big deal, and doing any one or combination of these things surely does not make you a bully; it makes you human.  But what I am referring to, is those people who do these things in such a way to put others down in an effort to make themselves look better.  People who do these things again and again without any regard or concern for how others around them feel or react.  People who create a hostile work environment by their repeated negative actions.  People who should know better because you have hinted through subtle statements, body language, or even a direct statement of “I don’t like it when you do this or that”   This is directed at those people that you are afraid to reply to or avoid because of their negativity towards everything.

For me, I have no problem standing up for my friends in person.  (Although online attacks are harder.) This has gotten easier as I get older.  But standing up for myself is a challenge because I ultimately know that nothing good comes of many of these interactions, so I save my energy for things that bring good to the world.  I go about my business the best way I can.  I make decisions based off what I know as a professional.  I don’t have time for drama, shenanigans or people who are constantly creating or participating in it.  I have been through enough in my life to know when to listen and when to realize that people are being self-serving at my expense.

I choose not to associate myself with bullies.  I choose not to associate myself with you and I will continue to keep my interactions to a minimum with you.  It is a conscious choice I make, and it’s just not healthy to associate yourself with crazy.  I guess that makes me an easy target as well.

And for the record, I sleep just fine at night.

Best Regards,

Jennifer

PS – Is your principal the bully?  Click here for some ideas to help your make it thorough the year.
What to do when your principal is the bully.

Looking for way to deal with the teacher bully?  Head on over to Education to the Core!

Ways to deal with teacher bullies from Education to the Core!

 

Please note:  this article was written as a means to just bring light to an issue that is happening in many schools.  It is not directed at any specific teacher or situation.  Any rude or inappropriate comments will be removed.

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Related Posts: Teacher Rants10 Truths About Teaching Kindergarten and Why I Took My Behavior Chart Off The Wall

116 Comments

  1. Meredith

    I returned from a maternity leave to a horrendous situation. One of my “team mates ” had taken a liking to my long term sub and decided that I should resign so she could teach in my place. The harassment I endured was life changing. After months of abuse, and attempting to speak to her as an adult, I went to administration. Not to get them to solve the problem, but to let them know that I was going to confront her so she will never harass me again. (I knew she would immediately report my confrontation). The abuse stopped and she ended up being transferred to another building. This was 10 years ago and I still will occasionally have a nightmare about it. I am writing this so maybe someone will not feel as alone as I did. I also want you to know that it made me very very tough. I have a thicker skin because of it and that has made me stronger.

    Reply
  2. Kim Caise

    This was an excellent article. Too bad the bullies won’t read or apply the info to themselves.

    Reply
  3. Lorraine Prados

    I have had the experience of working with two teachers that created and destroyed relationships through exclusion and division. It was difficult dealing with both of them. I came to realize both of them had serious self-esteem issues.

    Reply
  4. Joanna

    I read your Dear Bully letter with admiration. The language you use to convey your strength and will is helpful to me. I have been working with a very difficult teacher who also has all of the traits you mention (and more) and I was searching for the words to convey what I felt about her abhorrent behaviour.
    The first thing that struck me was her use of the f word in the classroom in front of children. I felt sick. Then she would make abusive comments about other members of our team, department and parents. It became so toxic around her.
    Whispering under her breath, badmouthing, then being overly friendly with these people in front of me like they were her best friends! So two-faced!
    I have tried to ignore her, to be passive and not react to change the subject when she is bitching and negativity, but patience has its limits. And recently her strange passive aggressive behaviour has made me question why I haven’t stood up to her before now. Your article gives me strength ?

    Reply
  5. jannine

    I read your Dear Bully letter with admiration. The language you use to convey your strength and will is helpful to me. I have been working with a very difficult teacher who also has all of the traits you mention (and more) and I was searching for the words to convey what I felt about her abhorrent behaviour.
    The first thing that struck me was her use of the f word in the classroom in front of children. I felt sick. Then she would make abusive comments about other members of our team, department and parents. It became so toxic around her.
    Whispering under her breath, badmouthing, then being overly friendly with these people in front of me like they were her best friends! So two-faced!
    I have tried to ignore her, to be passive and not react to change the subject when she is bitching and negativity, but patience has its limits. And recently her strange passive aggressive behaviour has made me question why I haven’t stood up to her before now. Your article gives me strength ?

    Reply
  6. Cara

    Is there an article where the principal and AP are the bullies? I need that one asap

    Reply
  7. Works with spies

    Don’t forget “Stop telling kids to report what I’m doing in my classroom.” I’ve encountered teachers who have kids spy on other teachers. Even though they don’t report everything to administrators, their “spying” undermines coworkers and is bullying!

    Reply
  8. dla from Clear Creek

    There are times when telling an administrator is the right thing to do. When you have been asked a direct question. When you know what is happening is not what is supposed to happen on a project that involves five teachers. When you know that what is happening or not happening jeopardizes student learning. When the problem is such that you cannot approach that other person to have a reasonable conversation. When that person interferes in your classroom. When that person causes you to have physical symptoms at the thought of having any kind of issue with that person.

    Reply
  9. Concerned Teacher

    I have seen gossip, gaslighting and miscommunication become extremely problematic for teachers in education lately. This negative behavior seems to have resulted in the changes that have taken place with the leadership model over the past 8 years. Unfortunately the current leadership model seems to creates division, displaces children as top priority and has created a system of communication where much is lost in translation. The current team leader model makes it hard to suggest opinions without backlash.

    After teaching for 20 years in elementary education, I have seen positive and negative changes take place. I have seen the pendulum swing back and forth, mandates come and go. I have witnessed struggles and growth. Of all the changes, I find the model that has been least effective to education is the team leader model accepted by most districts. I say this as a teacher who has been leader on and off the teams so I view it from both sides. Before the team model, the entire school was a team, all were leaders. We were friends across the grades, we lunched as one team, our team was our school, each equal members. Our goal was to improve our school for children. Grade levels would meet and discuss plans. There was not one chosen leader, all were leaders, voices were equal, and conversation were natural as the politics of the meeting were not predominant, rather the problems occurring in the classroom at that moment.

    Team models where there is one leader automatically create division. Pecking order is established, survival is the goal rather than the issues in the classrooms. Becoming friends with the leader so you have a voice is the underlying concern. Rather than focusing on problems at hand, there is a natural propensity to constantly speak in a manner that will be well perceived by the leader who then has discussions with the coach and principal. This is not always the case because there is the occasional team that works, however it is a shot in the dark where we assume positive intentions at all times from every member, there is no flexibility there.

    This system automatically takes away transparency. The team members can’t be transparent, and the leader must speak in a way that is acceptable to the administration. This is a system where control is not in the hands of the teachers. The leadership meetings become a place where conversations are had in privacy and only the chosen are invited. We need to go back where meetings are had as one team, where all are invited. As it stands the concern of what is happening to the school that used to funnel through a unified system has been replaced and thrust through a bureaucratic machine no better than an elaborate creation of Rube Goldberg. With the past team model, all were team leaders, the conversations, leadership and objectivity were organic and student driven. On given days, different members lead due to natural changes, good days, good plans and organic dynamics that could be called into action depending on the situation.

    Schools need to return to the traditional team model where we are trusted to discuss topics we see as problematic. The micro management must be removed so we can see what is happening in our own classrooms at the moment instead of being forced to be bobble heads in survival mode. Our power as teachers has been diminished through this current model I am afraid. We are gaslighting each other because we are in survival mode as opposed to being trusted to be the professionals we were trained to be. We need to call this for what it is and work towards a system that gives all voice and respect so that we can once again return to the immediate needs at hand, see each other as supporters rather than adversaries and become the actual teams we were without feeling oppressed or resentful. Veteran teachers and new teachers must have equal voice as it used to be and problems should be taken to one person, the administrator, so we are no longer playing a game of telephone but actually addressing the needs of our students.

    Reply
  10. Genevieve

    I worked so long and hard to get a teaching job- I’ve been at this school for about 5 years now- I started at the same time as another teacher who seems to have taken a dislike to me. I feel constantly watched and judged. She has written numerous “complaint” letters about me- with issues that have either been taken out of context- or that are simply not true. I feel like she is sabotaging my name and career. I don’t want to go back and I feel sick just thinking about it.

    Reply
    • Lynette

      Teacher bullies also stops other teachers from stopping them from hurting kids. I wish I would have stopped teacher bullies but they are dangerous to you and your job. My teacher bully use to write down and secretly record our conversation.

      Reply
  11. Sad Teacher

    As an older teacher who has returned to teaching after several years away, I have been shattered by the snarky, mean, rude, and selfish behavior of my fellow teachers. Not all of them by any means, but enough that I positively dread staff meetings. I feel judged and ostracized on a regular basis. There is little feeling of community and no sense of collegiality. It’s every teacher for her/himself. The more sarcastic and snarky you are the more popular you are.

    Reply
  12. Melody

    This should also include principals who bully… no bully is for children, harass and intimidate.

    Reply
  13. Cynthia

    I taught next to a team of two second grade teachers that bullied their student teacher to tears on a regular basis. I spent many hours with the student teacher reassuring her that what they were doing was wrong. She did go on to graduate and became an excellent teacher.

    Reply
  14. Tracy

    Sometimes administrators allow it to continue, and even join in.

    Reply
  15. laughingteacher

    Thanks for posting this! I would also add to the list those that don’t share ideas with the grade level during planning but look for every opportunity to interject wonder lesson ideas in front of Admin. “Where were you when the new teachers were struggling/asking for help to find ideas for lessons??”

    Reply
  16. Deb V

    I work in a daycare/ preschool and am the “new kid on the block.” I have had to stand up for myself and even though my administrator has backed me up every time, it still leaves a sick feeling in my stomach.It has taken me years to be able to. . Thank you for this letter. It always helps to know you’re not alone.

    Reply
  17. Norbert

    Go to endteacherabuse.org and read the different stories, including mine. Where is the teacher’s union? When will it stop? How can we tell students to stop bullying when the adults are doing the same type of bullying?

    Reply
  18. Vonna

    Great letter. I really liked your conclusion…So true and bullying happens a lot because some people have an agenda other than helping children.
    Wish more administrators were more sensitive to these issues.

    Reply
  19. Torie

    Great letter. As an administrator, I can tell you that we know who are the bullies and who are the superstars. Best advice I can give: Keep your heads up, do right by your students, and continue to learn and grow. If you feel you are being bullied, say something. Perhaps to the bully, but also to your supervisor. If they get enough complaints, they HAVE to address it. This is a tough enough field without having to deal with adults that can’t/won’t be professional.

    Reply
  20. CC494977

    Exclusion is definitely a form of bullying. I had this happen to me a few years ago–the other 2 on my team made plans, copies, shared ideas just between them, and would always get together without me. When I would come to them with an idea, they would inform me that they had already taken care of that. They connected and became best friends immediately once the newer one joined our team. It was horrible, not because I wasn’t the best friend, but because I was treated as though I was on the outside, and not a part of the team. Because I called them out on it, they spread gossip about me, went to our principal and lied to get me booted from the team. I was moved to another grade, and while they were kind enough to also lie to my new teammates about me, I proved my worth with them, and it was the best thing that could’ve happened for me. I now have a supportive and respectful teammate, and it’s amazing what we accomplish together. It’s unfortunate that a few teachers can create a high school atmosphere, in an adult space–it’s even worse when they put on such a show so others see them as the victims and the perfect teachers. Mean girls never really stop. But we must rise above.

    Reply
  21. bennie

    But there are very irresponsible teachers who interpret criticism [for his/her unacceptable work ethics] bullying.

    Reply
  22. Catalina P. De Tobio

    It indeed happened again and again in any learning institutions like mine. But sometimes my mind and heart silently opposed this idea. In silence, I prayed for them – my attackers and for me not to feel I was bullied …time’s hard but school life must go on…In silence i worked hard beginning to handicapped my being to those who bullied me.I was totally mute, deaf and blind with what they’ve done to me …I continued living worked hard in silence….now my successes make a noise for me and they’re now feeling bullied.GOD SPEED and keep them enlighten!

    Reply
  23. Camille Cavazos

    In 19 years of teaching, last year was the hardest and most difficult year because all of the things in your list happened. This article serves its purpose in bringing light to a problem that if not extinguished can fester wreak havoc in any grade level. Thank you for taking the time to write this article. It divulged everything that I have been feeling about last year. Let’a go forward and hope for a better year.

    Reply
  24. Sarah

    I wish I had this letter back in June. Due to the teacher who bullied me, I was asked to not come back to the school next year because of her actions, lies, rumors, and sheer hate. This is a topic that needs to be put out there more. It’s not just the kids that get bullied, the teachers are too.

    Reply
  25. Victor Fraser

    I worked in other jobs before coming to teaching. I have been in the profession for 22 years. When I first started I had similar feelings. Truth be told whenever I had been in a new job I experienced that. What I have come to understand was that it was my own insecurity that made me see things this way. I have since grown up and no longer take people places and things so personally Egocentricism is a characteristic of the emotionally immature.

    Reply
  26. Jons

    I was also bullied by co teacher. But Jennifer is true.. I can sleep tight at night knowing that I know what is right and wrong. We entered in school just for the love of teachings and advocacy to teach. We enter in an organization carrying dignity and integrity.. And those principles deserves “RESPECT”. A success of an individual did not measured on weight of your pocket or bulk of your bank account, or even on the highest education you attained. But by good attitude and behaviour you have.

    Reply
  27. jleach1973

    Thank you so much for this letter/article. I was actually put on medical leave and developed high blood pressure and an anxiety disorder, as well as PTSD. Still have not been cleared to go back by my doctor although the school was pretty much cleared out at the end of the year and the principal was moved in March. However, every evaluation ever done was good, no disciplinary write-ups, and since they kept giving me the “difficult” children I was doing everything I was asked to do. I guess I’m noy young and blond enough anymore to work there (no offense intended towards young blonds there!). I managed to stick it out for 3 years but finally realized that my own children needed a healthy mother more than anything. Exploring other options now but all I ever wanted to do was teach and I was dedicated- always. Any suggestions out there from anyone who has had a similar situation? Thanks for listening!!

    Reply
  28. Beverly

    I am not a teacher…but have a great appreciation and respect for teachers. Teachers today, have much greater challenges and responsibilities than in years past. It must be difficult enough, without dealing with bullying from your peers. This was a powerful message, well written, and should be passed on. It is also a message that can be applied to other careers, and areas of life as well. No one “knows it all”, and we can all learn from each other, and should respect others.
    Thanks for a very timely and much needed message, Jennifer! God bless!

    Reply
  29. kam

    I’ve worked with many young teachers who do all these things. And are extremely disrespectful to the older staff members. I’m not saying older staff can’t be bullies, but it’s not exclusive to experienced staff members. Some people can work as part of a team and some just can’t. I’ve been in and around education my entire life. I had many great lessons from my parents (both educators) about how to be a part of the team and not the one who upsets the flow of the team. And after teaching for 28 years I see more and more young teachers who don’t know how to be a part of the team. So many only think of what is going on in their classroom. They don’t understand that some of their actions impact other teachers, classrooms or programs. And remember, that cranky teacher may be dealing with some stuff outside of school. Or they might just be a cranky person, but maybe try to find out. Don’t be too quick to label them a bully. Have a great summer!

    Reply
  30. Kristen

    I am choosing not to eat lunch in the faculty room for just this reason! Distancing yourself from bullies is the most mature way to handle this.

    Reply
  31. Tracy Rosen

    As with children, bullying usually comes from a place of fear: fear of change, fear of failure, fear of not fitting in… Great admin teams work hand in hand with their school community to create trusting environments for learning. What saddens me is that bullying is usually systemic – if it is happening to teachers it is likely happening to students and parents as well.

    Reply
  32. Jennifer Byrne

    Thanks for sharing this. I’ve asked my principal to share it on our teachers portal for school. It reflects almost exactly on what’s going on in my school

    Reply
  33. Jeanne

    First of all, I wanted to say thank you for writing this. I feel like I could relate to it, both as someone who was bullied, and probably someone who younger teachers are annoyed by.
    I was bullied for several years by my team. It made me feel insecure and defensive. Some of the people have left, but those feelings are still there.
    I’m a reading specialist, so my schedule is different than a typical teacher. One year, my team planned our schedule while I was testing. They scheduled their lunch and break together and put me at a different time. That wasn’t obvious or anything. I felt like I couldn’t say anything because they did all that work and I’d be blamed for being negative or complaining.
    Any time I had an opinion or said anything that was different from what they wanted (which was all the time), they’d sabotage me. They’d go behind my back and talk to the principal about me. He then blamed me for the negative environment because it was 3 against 1, so it must be me.
    I tried to get a transfer or to get another teaching position, but it didn’t happen. After so many years of this, it has made me insecure about sharing my ideas. I probably try to talk louder in order to feel heard. I probably talk more about things than people care to hear. I hate to say, I’ve also become sort of negative at times. There might be a reason why “that teacher” does those things (I’m not condoning it though).
    After being treated badly for so long and talked about with others behind my back, it has caused me to lose the respect of others. I’m a little more reserved and serious than others, I’m not a social butterfly. I’m sure this doesn’t help.
    I LOVE the work I do with my students, but I should be able to LOVE working with my colleagues too. I often spend more time with them than I do my husband.
    Sadly, next year is going to be my last. I always pictured myself teaching forever, and now it’s going to come to an end.
    Again, thanks. All good things to think about.

    Reply
  34. Melissa

    I had to turn the finger at myself while reading this article. My department jumped from 4 teachers to 7 in one year. While some of the issues are brought on more by the structure of the program, I’m afraid I may have stuck with the comfortable instead of going the extra mile to make our newcomers feel more welcome. Thank you for speaking out.

    Reply
  35. Jessica

    I might add, I cannot try every new approach out there. If you have some new teaching techniques, programs, or material, I am happy to learn about some of them at my convenience. Remember, my administration constantly has new ideas for us to incorporate and I also find some on my own. I can only do so many approaches at a time.
    I have been the subject of 2 bullies, they are best friends. Everyone tells me not to take it personal, that’s just the way they are to everyone. Honestly, if people have to explain your behavior, then you should change or leave me alone.

    Reply
  36. Susan J Long

    Nice job, Jennifer. Although if one were to sit back and observe, the observer would say I had been bullied at one point or another during my 40+ years as an educator — basically in a small rural school district. Guess I was really too “dumb” or had too much self-esteem to really take notice. My students coming from that school did fantastically in college in the area I taught, including one who returned from 1st semester at an Ivy League school to inform me that he was TUTORING students because he was doing so well in that area and another who is now a professor at Texas A&M!!! I wasn’t the warm-fuzzy type person, but when the kids were in trouble, they came to me to help them through it. Ten+ years as an administrator allowed me to make certain that our staff worked as a team and built each other up instead of knocking one another down — and please notice that I said staff, because as far as our kids were concerned, it didn’t make any difference what the title was, we were ALL there to “teach” them!!! I retired from that position because I was certain I could never find such a fantastic group of people to work with again!!! Hope everyone can find that type of teamwork!

    Reply
  37. Ater

    This seems to be happening in schools all over

    Reply
    • Jennifer @ Simply Kinder

      I know. It’s super sad. Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
  38. Lauri

    YES!!!! So well-stated! My own experience was in a small Catholic school – the bully was a 6ft tall 300 pound woman and the principal was the biggest whiner I have ever met (over the age of 3) – it was dreadful!! Thank you for posting this!!!!!

    Reply
  39. Jennie

    How can you expect the children not to bully each other when the teaches are setting such a bad example?

    Reply
  40. Ellen Parker

    Excellent except for one thing. These folks can be experienced teachers (like the 32 year veteran you refer to) or even new teachers or those in between. Please don’t accept that it is always older teachers who negatively affect their coworkers. Simply not true.

    Reply
  41. A dedicated teacher

    I am an older teacher, 50, and had two teachers do almost all the things you listed above. I don’t have a binder of tricks and am a believer in DI. My administrator didn’t want to “choose sides” so I begged to be moved to a different grade level. I dread going back to school to see them this year. I was actually called rather screamed Hitler by one of them. Her apology to me was, “so sorry you got me so upset I stooped to that level.”

    The main issue that occurred was that I was asked to be team leader and neither of them were. The whole year was a mess. I walked on eggshells around them all year. Sure, they claims to have issues with me, like being childish for unfriending one on facebook. Yes, that was an issue brought up at school! The one new to the grade thought and thinks she knows everything there is to know about teaching reading, and lectures us every lesson plan meeting. In our reading meetings, she goes on and on and on and doesn’t see the eye rolling of all her colleagues as a point to stop. Funny, she had a student fail reading STAAR this year, but I didn’t. She also befriends people, and no quicker than they turn their back, she’s talking trash about them. She actually had a parent spy on another teacher and report to her what was going on in that teachers classroom! I heard them talking outside my door, and this teacher told us about it at the beginning of the year during our first team meeting! Wow!

    The other is very unprofessional. F$)@ is her favorite word during meetings. She chews gum like a cow all day and allows her students to disobey school and class rules through running in the halls, late to rotation, lunch, etc… They’ve both said things to their parents about me and started trouble with a couple of my parents. They’re both such brown noses they get away with everything. Throughout the year, one would leave in the afternoon without getting a sub, and have the other watch her class. Both of them talk back and forth on Twitter about me, of course without saying my name, but they’re digs none the less.

    Wow. That felt good to get it out! So nice to know I’m not the only one who had gone through this. Wish me luck in August.

    Reply
  42. Linda S Locke

    This very thing was the topic of my dissertation. Thank you for sharing and talking about the elephant in the room!!!

    Reply
  43. KLee

    I am really hoping the change in administration at my campus will put a stop to this at my school. I dread team time almost everyday because of some of things discussed in your article.

    Reply
  44. Emily

    Never experienced this with a “regular” colleague, in my experience, it tends to be the teachers who taught for two years and then became “coaches” or “reading experts” and have decided they’re soooo much better than everyone else. They’re insufferable, and the fact that they get paid twice what I do to stand in my classroom with a clipboard and make silly judgments (why are you letting your students work on the floor, you shouldn’t do that…) is infuriating.

    Reply
  45. Becky

    I took 2 things that years ago helped me a lot… Our district offered Steven Covey Habits of Effective People, and Human Dynamics. those taught me about managing stress, finding what’s important, and learning to work with others. I hope that being outspoken does not offend others too often, although I do like a friendly debate. The only time I think I make things uncomfortable is when I feel strongly that something is not in the best interests of my students. (Or is harmful for them) I do love how education is always changing, and I love to learn new things, even though I have taught over 20 years. Last year I moved to kindergarten and found it so rewarding. I hope anyone who is struggling does not give up because this really is such a great job, challenges and all.

    Reply
  46. Melissar

    Jennifer, well said. I hear and see these type situations often from family and friends that are near, dear and faraway from me and it hurts. This is a great letter to post in my personal space in my classroom. Than my you. Melissa

    Reply
  47. Susan Mescall

    Right on! I was the new teacher who joined a group of teachers who had taught together for many years. It was tough. I got used to doing things my own way and became stronger. I was lucky enough to meet an experienced teacher who joined my school’s staff in my third year. She took me under her wing and made me the teacher I am today. I was lucky and I hope you find someone who will be with you and be supportive.
    Sue Mescall

    Reply
  48. Nancy Burling

    Thank-you for sharing! Why does this have to happen?!! I got a ‘friend’ a job at my school and now deal with being bullied by her! What gives? She’s tight with the principal and excludes me. Wished I knew why, I might be able to do something about it. Thanks for hearing me out. :/

    Reply
  49. Roberta

    Well said. I think we all have encountered a teacher like that in our work places….and it stinks! Often I try to just close my door and do my teaching. But it would be so much nicer to leave my door open and welcome everyone in.

    Reply
  50. Kayla

    I left my previous job because of 2 teachers I worked with that would bully me to my face and behind my back. They would even go as far as to yell at me in front of the students. I would cry on my way to work almost every day and on the way home again. I worked at that school for 2 years (the first 2 of my career) and I seriously considered leaving the profession because of how miserable I was.

    I was fortunate enough to find a new job with amazing coworkers and have (for the most part) thoroughly enjoyed my last 2 years there. Do I sometimes disagree with my coworkers at my current job? Absolutely, but we are able to have those disagreements without being disrespectful to each other. My current district is one of the lowest paying districts in the area which actually had me casually searching for a new job. Ultimately I made the decision that my happiness at work because I get along with my coworkers was more important than an extra $6,000 per year.

    Reply
  51. Vincenzina

    Thanks for sharing. Been teaching almost 20 years and unfortunately have been dealing with a bully for the last two years. My colleague and I are new to kindergarten. The third kindergarten teacher (who by the way has been teaching kindergarten for almost 10 years!) has NEVER supported and shared her knowledge or ideas with us EVER! Her ideas are always better. Our ideas are never good enough! Planning the welcome to kindergarten and kindergarten graduation has been nothing but a nightmare. She does EVERYTHING in her power to discretely plan ideas that make her look “better” without consulting with us as a team. It’s very insulting and angers me like you wouldn’t believe until I realize that it’s not worth getting upset about. When we sat a couple of months prior to kindergarten graduation she announced that she wouldn’t be present for the event and would be leaving a week prior to summer vacation. She didn’t give us any further explanation which she has a right not to. Last few weeks prior to graduation she was on a HUGE mission to take control and take responsibility to do things “her way”! It was nothing but a NIGHTMARE! My colleague and I had to step in a few times to make changes and revisions as she didn’t consult with us about certain things. Things got so bad at the end. Her last day she became so frustrated and refused to help us decorate the gymnasium as she probably felt things weren’t going her way. She basically “washed her hands from everything!). She left the school without saying goodbye to anyone. Other staff members noticed her unacceptable behaviour. The worst part is that we teach in the Catholic school system. There was NOTHING Catholic about her behaviour. I’ve learned to do things my way……trying to find the BEST way to meet the needs of my students. I speak up and voice my opinion when I have to. I don’t let anyone bring me down. I find strength and courage in God to empower me to care for and teach these young children to the best of my ability. We are all in this together……to work, help and care for each other. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. I think the best thing to do is to maintain your professionalism, stay positive, do what you feel is the right thing to do and don’t let anyone bring you down. Set a positive example and be the better person. Focus your energy on the children. After all…..this is the reason why chose to get into this profession in the first place!

    Reply
  52. Kris

    Thank you for helping me to not feel alone in a deeply upsetting situation. After finally standing up for myself by simply, quietly stating that I was “not comfortable” discussing my personal relationship status with another teacher in the middle of a classroom full of students (oh yes — just one of many inappropriate issues going on), said teacher yelled at me, grabbed her things and stormed out of the classroom, and has since encouraged her group of friends on staff to stop speaking to me altogether. It has been so frustrating to feel as though I want to show up to school everyday, do my best, serve my students, and be positive about it, and yet to have such a negative force threatening to take away from my energy and vibe year in and year out. Sigh. I apologize for the pity party! I just was surprised to have that post hit so close to home. I’m glad to not be alone. Thank you.

    Reply
  53. E Wray

    I was treated wrong by a couple other teachers. They hated that I had the children learning and made it fun. They arranged for me to receive some older red roses. They should have been thrown away. That hurt to the core. So I tried to not let it bother me snipped ends to grow and pulled old petals off. They may have knocked me down, but honey I got up again. If you are reading this and you know it was you. Haha guess who got the last laugh. Me. Thank you so much. I learned how to put bullies like you in their place. I’ll be praying for you.

    Reply
  54. Sergio Flores

    This reads as a model to respond to all the corporate reformers’ minions that have supported and promoted all those ideas that have demoralized teachers. Dialogue and debate should be in place, rather than indoctrination and coercion. I understand perfectly the feeling of helplessness for all the teachers who are just obeying and complying knowing that something is wrong. This message is not really about a teacher bullying other teachers, is about a toxic system that gaslights and confuses unsuspecting teachers, forcing them into ideological submission. The numbers of teachers experiencing frustrations and depressions has increased continuously. And this over stress is affecting personal health, relations, and even emotional well being.

    Reply
  55. Roseanne grattan

    EXCELLENT ARTICLE All very exact /precise statement of fact and actions in many schools. However these actions seem all to common these days ‘the bully club’ exists at all levels and denominations. Having been promoted from a religious sector to a post in the non denominational sector my life was made ‘hell’ I was promoted by merit not religion and ‘did someone out of the job’ they had anticipated was rightly their. Life got worse for many when Faculties evolved and younger less experienced teachers were promoted Their target was to ‘get rid’ no matter how.

    Reply
  56. Lakeska

    I understand that some teachers feel bullied. Question, aren’t we all adults? How long are you going to go through life being bullied? At some point, you’ve got to assert yourself in any profession. Personally, I don’t spend time in the teacher’s lounge or dining room. Too messy and I am usually setting up for lessons. As far as administration goes, they don’t want to be placed in the middle of foolishness. They would rather you handle staff issues on your own. They have too much to do already. On any job, you’re going to have bullies, because they grow up too. It’s simple to just walk away and don’t engage. Pretend the’re invisible and continue to do what you know has been successful in your classroom. I don’t understand how you allow someone to mistreat you. What do you with pushy, rude, and aggressive parents? Maybe I am not easily bullied, because I know my craft and don’t play games. I am direct with everyone, including administration. My suggestion, open your mouth when someone is attempting to bully you or criticize you without cause. Speak up, you’re an adult.

    Reply
  57. V

    It is a terrible feeling to be bullied by coworkers. It is equally as upsetting to be bullied by your administrator. I delt with this treatment during the first 2 years of my teaching career. I have just completed my 16th year in teaching. I can tell you that you do not have to put up with being treated like that, and that it’s not like that every where. If you’re an educator at heart, don’t give up. Don’t let anyone make you feel inadequate, or push you out. Just remember there is a reason for everything. There’s a life lesson, perhaps. Stay with your dream, and don’t give up.

    Reply
  58. Lisa Perry

    With all due respect, I do not see any bullying behavior in this list. A definition of bullying (from https://www.stopbullying.gov/what-is-bullying/) is “unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children [or working adults] that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose..”

    There are some possibilities (throwing people under the bus), but the examples are all standard for working and interacting with other human beings who have different social abilities. Yes, some people will teach the same way. How is that creating a bullying work environment?

    I am a teacher, btw.

    Reply
  59. Xena

    There is a trend of more and more schools becoming a hostile work environment.. Look at the leadership. you will see where the rot begins. Teaching becomes a world of being a middle schooler again. With clicks and the queen bee mean girl… I left teaching one day and was driven to long term therapy which included PTSD treatment..

    Reply
  60. Michelle

    Good read. Thanks for writing the words that are so hard to say. I have been teaching for almost 25 years and have felt bullied by older teachers (mostly when I was new) but, now the bully shoes are on younger feet. Sometimes years of experience are better than the newest book that is out. As a senior teacher I have been through many changes and just because a new cover has been placed on a book it doesn’t mean the material inside is new. Many of the items in your article go for administration as well. If we want what is best for children we need to work together.
    Thanks again for your article.

    Reply
  61. Jennifer

    Wow! I really did think this was an isolated incident. I had no idea others went through it too.

    Reply
  62. The Educreator

    I’m a first year ELL teacher for an entire district, so I bounce to multiple schools on a daily basis. It has really made getting to know my fellow teachers extremely difficult. I’ve tried joining in on conversations in the teacher’s lounge and around the school, but it almost always ends with one word responses or being ignored altogether. Most days, I try to make myself feel better by saying, “I’m here for the kids, not the unfriendly teachers.” Still, I oftentimes find myself asking, “Why am I so unlikeable?” I never treat people the way I’m being treated (even people I do not know), so it’s really hard for me to just brush it off and move on. I used to consider myself a social person, but trying to engage my coworkers in any kind of conversation has just been exhausting and almost demeaning. Being the only ELL teacher in the district has left me feeling completely isolated, and to be honest, depressed.

    Reply
  63. Anon

    My band class and director have ruined me. Nobody likes me around, and always has something to say to me or behind my back, and my director calls me out, humiliated me, and kills my dignity in front of the class, which they laugh at.

    Reply
  64. Jean

    I finally made it out after 7 years at a school with bullies. The worst one was the principal herself. It took three months at my new school to stop having panic attacks every Sunday night. Now I actually love going to work each day. I am so thankful that I was able to get in a new school. It has made all the difference in the world.

    Reply
  65. Klynn

    WOW! What power!

    Reply
  66. Stacy

    In the section titled “Stop talking about yourself all the time.”, than should be then. I’m not a teacher. I only read the article because it piqued my curiosity. Is there really middle school drama amongst teachers? Good grief! How sad our society has become.

    Reply
  67. Lis Boan

    Wow I am sorry that you or any one else has to be in a situation like this. I have been so fortunate to work with mostly helpful supportive people and I hope I have been the same to my colleagues as well!

    Reply
  68. Beth Stevens

    As a child, I absolutely hated middle school. And then I got the insane idea of becoming a teacher. I was positive that every bullying freak from my middle school had morphed into the “adults” around me. And these issues you highlight are not just with co-worker teachers. It can also be found in administration and in the parent population. While much of the drama can be avoided by limiting interactions with the crazy, for me I decided that any setting requiring me to avoid others simply isn’t a healthy place to be. Which is sad because I passionately love the teaching part of teaching. I miss it. But I valued my sanity more. My deepest respect goes out to the excellent teachers who continue to battle day in and day out. YOU are the heroes of the world.

    Reply
  69. Shelly

    What can you do as a first year teacher that was bulied and told the principle finally and he chose to not relect you

    Reply
    • Jennifer @ Simply Kinder

      Hard to have happen – but I would definitely move on and consider it a gift to be forced to move. Are you able to find another job? There are many great schools out there and you DON’T need to be in an environment like that.

      Reply
      • Tina

        Yes, in many cases like this I think you are too good for them. They don’t deserve your hard work! Move on!

        Reply
      • Carol Bodofsky

        To extend the comment about being bullied as a first year teacher, then not rehired by a principal. Finding a new place to work is truly a gift. That teacher had the misfortune to be in a toxic environment. Every single teacher I know, and there have been many over the years, who had that experience, found immediate success in her next district – and was highly respected and appreciated. Whenever I became aware of those situations, I lept into action – building up the bullied new teacher. My famous line is, ” I hear you are having some issues and looking at other districts. I don’t need to know any more about it, but I write really good letters of recommendation, and i would be honored to write one for YOU. I have seen you teach, and you are simply amazing because…” If I hear about the issue earlier, I move into a protective, supportive, coaching role as soon as possible. My biggest concern is that teachers who bully other teachers, have issues that may also make them toxic to children. THAT is what we need to watch for!

        Reply
    • Brenda Schlomach

      Say good riddance to that school and move on to a better place.

      Reply
    • Nancy Cox

      Shelly, you will see that this is really the best thing to happen. I know of many teachers that left for this reason and they are much happier in their new positions because the bullying wasn’t at their new jobs.

      Reply
    • Evie

      I think the most annoying part is when “that” teacher is promoting anti bullying campaigns in school while “he/she” is the biggest bully ..

      Reply
  70. karen

    This is for my daughter. She is in her first year teaching and loves her job. The problem is the teachers on her team. There has been a lot of issues but I think the worst came this past week when the other teachers since children with Post-it notes to my daughter saying how bad of a teacher she was that she should never have gone into teaching and they sent these with children that could read degrading her in front of these children. it’s heartbreaking to see her cry everyday she works so very hard early in and Stays late. I don’t know what to tell her please help

    Reply
  71. Tanya

    Thank you very much for this. I am currently being bullied by a teacher. She only attacks me and now she went very public about it, purposefully. I have been bullied throughout my life so I was able to move on, but she upset so many others on my behalf. Even though this horrid thing has happened/continued, I am astonished at the support I have gotten from others who saw what she did.

    Reply
  72. Eva

    Thank you very much for this article, for knowing that others meet this issue too. Thank you for making me not feel alone! I wish those would read it too who inspired this!

    Reply
  73. MaryCarol Smith

    This could be me! She was older, but I had more experience, and the real sticking point was the kids liked me better! She did everything in her power to get me fired. Our first principal saw right through her, but then we got a new principal; she really snowed him. Everybody knew the score except him. She finally retired and this year has been heaven. I just tried to keep my head down and do a good job, but those years were just the worst. I’m proud of myself for surviving.

    Reply
  74. glorisadol

    It’s so sad that we teachers beheave like this… I’ m going to print it and hang it at the teacher’s room! Thanks for the post

    Reply
  75. Sodone

    Can you write one to admin? My principal bullied me out of the district (after nearly 20 years). She was principal for 3 at the time and continues to rule with fear and intimidation. Why the district allows it? Her test scores are good.

    Reply
  76. Wanda Larrington Becker

    It happens to paras, too. I’ve had teachers outright lie to the principal about me to the point where I actually got fired for something I didn’t even do! And the principals always believe the teachers over the lowly paras that they can’t do without! Sooooo frustrating!

    Reply
  77. "Diane"

    I lost my job after 16 years of service due to being bullied by a coworker for a year and a half, I worked at a membership wholesale warehouse though not a teaching facility, I reported the problem to five different managers and nothing ever change. I didn’t only deal with a attitude and gossip all the time, I was being threatened in a way of getting up on me saying I best watch myself as she would bump up on me, she turned people against me and at times they would act like they were going to run into me with a flatbed and many other thing problems like that, she was just like the women you described, she wanted all the attention on her. I ended up going through depression and anxiety, when I woke up in the morning to go to work I would start to have very strong anxiety and panic attacks and couldn’t bring myself to go to work. To bring this to an end I lost my job due to too many sick call’s,.Here it is ten months later and I still haven’t found a job. My unemployment has ran out and I’m living off my 401-k .I’m in my fifty’s and it seems no one wants to hire someone that has been dismissed from a company like this one at my age,. It’s crazy how one person that’s a JERK can hurt anyone like she has done to me. I wish I would have been tougher like you!

    Reply
  78. Rebecca

    Very good article. I will say it has a feeling of being written by a younger teacher to an older teacher, but the bullying can go both ways. Just because someone is older or more experienced does not mean they teach the same thing every year or don’t love to learn new practices and strategies. We should all respect and learn from each other.

    Reply
    • Jennifer @ Simply Kinder

      I see where you could feel this way. I actually taught for 15 years so I would not consider myself a younger teacher at all. I guess I just have not had any really crazy experiences with younger teachers. But I agree it’s all about respect! Thanks for stopping by!

      Reply
    • Ellen Parker

      I agree.

      Reply
  79. Jamie

    We have a group of women at our school who refer to themselves as the “fab 5”. They even got a group picture on professional picture day. Really? How lame can you be…?

    Reply
    • Jennifer @ Simply Kinder

      Sad truth that this stuff goes on all over the place.

      Reply
  80. Lula

    Wow….this described someone at my school almost EXACTLY…..

    Reply
    • Jennifer @ Simply Kinder

      Sad but true. So glad I was able to write something so many people were able to relate too. It’s hard to deal with these types of people. Hang in there!

      Reply
      • Monica

        Thank you for this, it is spot on! I was blessed to work side by side with dear friends for many years… then they left me. Adjusting to new team members has been difficult to say the least. I realize I’ve been guilty of some of these things too, but your line, “people who do these things in such a way to put others down in an effort to make themselves look better” made an important clarification. Sad that some of us feel the need to keep to ourselves in order to minimize the drama. Thanks for letting me know I am not alone!

        Reply
        • Kat

          I was in the exact same place just this year. My whole team left and I had to start over. I think about how by the end of the year I was just eating by myself and sticking to my own classroom just to avoid conflict with another team member. It made it hard to get friendly with other people because that bossy teacher was always around the corner and always ready to gossip. Being the team leader didn’t help because the other teacher just steam rolled everything. Luckily it’s summer and the other teacher opted not to return to the same team so hopefully next year will be better! Thanks for writing this and making me feel like it wasn’t just me!

          Reply
  81. readingaddict

    You are never alone, Kaitlin! I taught in a Catholic school as well, and these things do happen–all over. Although I cannot begin to understand your personal pain, I would hope that you could hang in there through the end of the school year. Don’t let the bullies win! Stand up for yourself, and if you can’t find that inner strength just yet, remember that you can take the high road and do what you believe is best for your students, step by step, day by day. My first year of teaching I had to replace a much-beloved, highly sought-after, much-experienced Kdg teacher. I felt that I was constantly being compared to her (and not faring well) and I hated it! I was intimidated by her memory! What I didn’t find out until the following year was that although there were many who liked the previous teacher, many did not care for her teaching style or the way she interacted with parents and staff and they actually found me “refreshing” and fair, honest, kind, and a good teacher on my own. I was ready to quit about this time that year, too, because I couldn’t stand being in her shadow. It took a lot of soul-searching, positive self-talk, and some days even a gentle push from my friends and family to get me through that first year. Little did I know that there was a light at the end of that dark tunnel! I eventually made friends on the staff (quite a few!) and it turned out to be one of my best teaching experiences. Certainly one full of personal growth! And I believe it made me a better teacher in the long run, because I had to really look hard at what I believed to be “best practices” (including professionalism!!) and continue to do my utmost to meet the needs of the role; it built my confidence to have to persevere! I hope the same for you, Kaitlin. Regardless of your decision, don’t let the bullying of a few keep you from your purpose: To be the best professional educator you can be, in your way.

    Reply
  82. Tammy

    Don’t quit! You are there for a reason! I know that to some standing up for themselves is easy, but for others it is beyond difficult. Please don’t let whomever is doing this win! I am sending up prayers of strength for you!

    Reply
  83. kaitlincasey

    I’m in tears. I am a first-year teacher at a Catholic school teaching kindergarten. I am at my wit’s end, debating whether or not to quit because I cannot stand the abuse. Thank you for these words! I’m so glad I’m not alone in this.

    Reply
    • Jill L

      Don’t quit! Teaching K can be amazing! Trust your gut, close your door, be the teacher you’d want your own kiddos to have and do what’s best for kids. Ignore teachers who can’t be professional and find one mentor in your school you can trust as both a colleague and a friend, it will make a world of difference! You got this!

      Reply
      • Jennifer @ Simply Kinder

        Well said. Thanks for stopping by!

        Reply
  84. Teacher Cora

    It says all the things I wanna say to those kind of teachers. You empower me with your blog. Kudos!

    Reply
  85. Leslie Booth

    In dealing with these same situations, I have seeked Gods wisdom and prayers. God says he who is without sin, cast the first stone. He also says to look at yourself first because that is the only person you can change. Change my heart lord. We can’t change others, but we can change how we respond to others. I agree these things are difficult to deal with daily, but I choose to be the better person. Yes, do remove them from yourself, don’t let them be the voice in your head that tells you your not good enough, etc. but do listen for anything they say that you really might need to work on. Reflection is a great tool to help us improve.

    Reply
  86. Lori Morales

    It happens more often than you think. I read all the comments and I can appreciate it from all the different perspectives too. Walking in someone elses shoes can give u a better insight as to what their feeling, of course taking many factors into account. The main point is that we should always try to be professional and courteous.

    Reply
  87. Clare McHugh Von Stieglitz

    Workplace harassment does exist. I would certainly consider these harassing behaviours. Bullying is not just a student issue. It is the repetition that makes it bullying. Thank you for the article. Large workplace can develop horrible culture a. Most just vote with their feet, rather than challenge it. Good on you for bringing it up.

    Reply
  88. Eileen Hargis

    I think this article stung quite a few of you for the obvious reason. If the shoe fits, wear it!!!!

    Reply
  89. Valerie Conner

    I have read some comments that say that this does not fall into the catergory of bullying. One or two incidences would not be but when a co-worker has a pattern of some of these behaviors, there is a problem. If the person is doing this things in an effort to control others, it is bullying. I have been in departmental meetings where one teacher shoots down any idea presented that is not his/her own, devalues everything anyone else says or does, and tries to control the entire department or grade level even though they are not the department head. It is not just annoying, it is bullying.

    Reply
  90. Lynn French

    This is rampant in the nursing profession as well. Seems as though the self serving narcissist is in the increase as well.

    Reply
  91. RoxAnne Jupe

    Thank you for sharing! I thought I was alone in feeling this way. I have been in several of these situations before. And your examples DO fall under the category of bullying!

    Reply
    • annehendrickswriter

      Thank you for this article. I experienced first hand bullying on a level at my first school that transcended professional into a personal level that ultimately leave after years – and I never looked back. The bully is still there – and personally, I just am shocked she got by with her evilness. Thank you for this article – you did a great job on something that really happens. On another note: I taught on other grade levels and elementary was the only time I ever saw this happen from teacher to teacher. Principals on all levels of education? Well, now, that’s another story! 😀

      Reply
  92. M

    I had sealt with a team member who bullied me to the point of me being signed off for depression and then resigning from my post.
    I remember being built with anxiety when driving up to the school gates. Panicking when seeing her car because I knew she’d do something to create drama that day or just ruin my day. Her bullying started to ruin relationships around me at home and with friends.

    Reply
  93. Tracey

    Thanks! It’s good to know we are not alone.

    Reply
  94. Wendy

    Yes, I’ve experienced it and left a position to get away from it. Crying every day because I was a target was awful. And these people call themselves Christians and attend church, thinking that makes it okay to tear others down. Awful.

    Reply
    • Laura

      I was bullied and struck ( they would pretend that they were speaking to me and hit me every time they walk by) by teachers for years, it was an order from the Superintendent ( Dr. Charles Larke) to get rid of me. I tried filing a law suite but to no avail, I did not have any one to stand with me. I was alone. Something must be done about this kind of abuse, some how we got to support one another. Maybe we can form out own group. When I started teaching, I was already in middle life, and I had to work because I did not have any help from family so I stuck it out. It’s has gotten so bad now, it’s reminds me of people from the ghetto. They don’t have any sympathy towards people at all.

      Reply
  95. Cristy

    I quit my art teacher job after years working same school for a BULLY junior high coordinator. Since then I am sad because I loved my school, my partners and my kids.

    Reply
  96. Kelly

    I applaud you for writing this and I say good for you! I agree with everything you said. We (educators) are in this together. We should be there for one another and helping each other out and sharing and caring and all those other things we teach our kids/students. GOOD FOR YOU. You rock on with your great self!

    Reply
  97. rwredhead

    Thanks for sharing this blog post! Well said.

    Reply
  98. Alisa

    I got nothin’ but love for ya girlie!

    Reply

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  1. School Culture: Toxic Environments and Teacher Bullies - IgnitED - […] week I posted a blog post that featured a letter to teachers who bully other teachers at school. When…

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